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Welcome To terminalrun.com, Cyberspace Home Of National Bestselling Submarine Fiction Author Michael DiMercurio

READERMAIL:

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: SUB CIG
From: Gary Goldstein
To: readermail@terminalrun.com

Dear Michael,

I'm sorry we didn't have more contact during the writing of CIG To Submarines, but since the process seemed to be flowing so smoothly, I decided to keep my nose out of the process.

What I really want to do is thank you for your fantastic contribution to the book. I finally have had the opportunity to read the chapters at my leisure (a luxury we Alpha editors rarely enjoy) and I cannot tell you how pleased I was with how beautifully it turned out. The tour chapters are especially impressive (although the prudes in the G-rated Alpha hierarchy did have a problem with the obscenities, but you can't win 'em all). With the wealth of painstaking detail and technological info, CIG to Submarines will definitely be the most up-to-date and comprehensive non-fiction book on the subject. I'm hoping for great sales on this pup.

Again, my deepest thanks for joining the project. Your contribution elevated the book from merely good to fucking fantastic, and I am humbly grateful. It's my hope that we can get together on another project very soon.

Sincerely yours,
Gary Goldstein
Senior Editor
Alpha Books

From: Michael DiMercurio
To: Gary Goldstein
Subject: SUB CIG

Hi Gary,

This email really touched me. Thanks so much for the compliment, particularly from a world wise editor!

We'd like to put this on the next newsletter. By the way, I'm getting more emails asking about the CIGs than the fiction.

When will CIGSub publish?

Mike

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Devilfish Patch
From: Ken Johnson
To: readermail@terminalrun.com

Michael,

Welcome back! I am sure you don't remember me, but I am a former submarine officer who went on to work in NAVSHIPS Code 425 as a Sturgeon Class Program Engineer. I had asked at that time if you really thought the U. S. Navy was ready to have women aboard our submarines. Well, as you may already know, the Norwegian Navy has (or at least had recently) a female Commanding Officer of one of their subs.

Anyway, do not have "Terminal Run" yet. Checked the local Borders Books outlet last evening and they have 12 copies on order, but not yet in. May try Barnes & Noble today. (Don't want to wait for Amazon.com, if I can get it sooner.

I am such an avid fan of yours I actually bought a USS Devilfish patch at the Submarine Force Museum some time back. I was going to send it to you, but figured you must have one already, right? Anyway, I thought I would scan it and send it to you in case you don't.

Ken Johnson
Former LT, USS Sea Owl (SS 405) and USS Halfbeak (SS 352)

[DEVILFISH PATCH]
CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Recently finished Terminal Run...
From: Steven Muma
To: readermail@terminalrun.com

Mr. DiMercurio,

With the anticipation killing me,I picked the book up last week and could hardly put the dang thing down (much like all your other novels). Just wanted to relay my appreciation for your hard work--the book is excellent, and it has immediately become one of my favorites in the series. I feel like you really finished the series strongly with Threat Vector (Regarding Threat Vector: I felt a real sense of loss when the cruise ship went down, which is a big credit to your writing. After being used to encountering the same characters in subsequent books, it was tough when they were suddenly gone.) and now Terminal Run. Great action, and tons of interesting characters. I thought the India/China conflict was a great subplot, and I was feeling the nostalgia right with Pacino Sr. as he re-took command of the SSNX.

Best of luck with your next project; I'm certainly looking forward to it. In the meantime, I'll probably give Terminal Run another ride. ;)

Thanks,

Steven Muma

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Rocket Ron
From: Tim Sharp
To: readermail@terminalrun.com

Dear Mr. DiMercurio:

I just finished reading Phoenix Sub Zero for the third time and it was as wonderful a read as it was the first time. I was just thinking about Rocket Ron Damanski and I wish I could read more about him. Next to Pacino, he is probably my favorite character in all of your novels. I really love his style. In the book where he says to the sarcastic British sonar man, "Aw, your Queen wears army boots," I crack up. So many of your book's characters have such depth that I find myself wanting to hear more about them. Like the captain who puts on a cowboy outfit and goes into the control room to inspire his men in Piranha Firing Point. That's just great writing and so fun to read. Anyway, I can't get enough of your books. I do have a question though. In your books when you write a sitrep or flash message you always end it with //TS// or //BT//. What does that mean? Well, good luck with your new book. I will be buying it as soon as it gets to the book store. Take care.

Your loyal fan,
Tim Sharp
Rockford, IL.

From: Michael DiMercurio
To: Tim Sharp
Subject: Rocket Ron

Hi Tim,

Thanks for the accolades on the characters. When I wrote Phoenix, I knew a real Rocket Ron, and he was the model for Daminski, just as my bride is the model for Colleen Pacino. I used to love wondering, what would the Rocket do in this situation?

I actually wanted to do a prequel, so that I could reuse the Rocket. Unlike some of my technothriller friends, I don't bring them back once they're dead!

The //BT// is standard Navy for -- I believe -- "break." As in "immediate execute, turn zero nine zero, break, execute. In Morse code it is dah dit dit dit dah. The only Morse I remember. Anyway, it is the indication that that message has ended, so the computer or operator knows the next one is coming if there are a string of messages. Written message equivalent to "out" I suppose.

Thanks again for the kind words about the characters.

See you at test depth,

Michael DiMercurio

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Just some reader feedback to keep you going...
From: WONG, GARY
To: readermail@terminalrun.com

Hello Michael,

Just got done reading your published fan mail. Have to say my Manager gave me a questionable look when I chuckled aloud about Dan Kohn's questions. Your so right, why would anyone want to do all those things from Q&A #1 so late in life! And on #5, it's both frightening hilarious how accurate that is!

I first wrote to you sometime last year explaining how I got to knowing your novels. Needed a quick book (Threat) for a flight to China due to work, pulled it from my stepson's shelf, got suck into it, ordered the remaining novels, and finished them all within 6-months). BTW, up until Threat, I've only read two book.....The Mouse and The Motorcycle (back in Elementary) and The Hot Zone.

I'm "trying" to digest your competitor's novel about a missing Nuclear Bomb (also a movie...we won't mention names..hint hint), but find it best to read it while on the head! I've had this book about 4 months and have just finished chapter 7! At last, now I can set that book back on the shelf to collect that all-important- dust, go out and get Terminal Run, and focus on some real reading!

PLEASE keep up the great work and tell you publisher (and wife) us readers think.....uh, make that know..... you're doing one hell of a job and is very appreciated.

Take care and good hunting,

Gary

Hi Gary,

Great to hear from you! And thanks for the feedback. It helps to be compared favorably to the competitors, particularly since one reason I did this was in answer to certain other writers who (I felt) did a poor job of portraying the real Navy.

Anyhow, I hope you'll enjoy TERMINAL RUN, and keep me posted on what you think!

See you at test depth,

Michael DiMercurio

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Glad Terminal Run is here
From: Tom Schmid
To: terminalrun.com

Dear Michael,

No need to reply to this email.

Just a quick note to express my thrill in knowing there is another one of your books for me to buy. I love your books, and it has been a grueling wait for the most recent edition.

Great work.

Yours,

Tom Schmid

Hi Tom,

I'm really glad you're ready for TERMINAL RUN. It was years in the making, but I'm hoping it was worth the wait. Please let me know what you think when you're done!

See you at test depth,

Michael DiMercuri

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Terminal Run
From: Les Simons
To: readermail@terminalrun.com

Dear Michael,

I just finished Terminal Run. It was outstanding,I've read all your books and I feel it is the best yet. As a dedicated reader I find myself completely immersed in the events happening in the story.The stories are so real with the intense detail that I love. I could feel the hairs raise on the back of my neck when Anthony crawled back in to the sub. Thanks for providing such a wonderful book. I look forward to your next one.However I ask myself how to you top this one. Somehow I have faith that you will come through.

Good luck in future stories!

Les Simons

Hi Les,

Thanks so much for your review, particularly since it was the first one! That scene where young Patch goes back in was one of my favorite of everything I've written to date. If you liked TERMINAL RUN, I know you'll like TITLE CLASSIFIED, which is going very well.

Thanks again for the great review, and please post it on Amazon.com and BN.com under TERMINAL RUN.

Finally, I'd like to get you a signed copy, so if you'll write me back with your address I'll ship it ASAP!

See you at test depth,

Michael DiMercurio

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Book review
From: Scott Turchin
To: readermail@terminalrun.com

Oh man, outstanding book... Damn chapter 9 had me sweating with Anthony, now remember I'm former army but I know the physics of buoyoncy etc... Better get started on the next one... I'll have to start from book 1 now and go back forward...

PS, I can only guess that Anthony and Alemeda get married (Hope so!)

Anyway the review:

Chapter one warms up the vortex engines, chapter two straps you on the vortex rocket and ignites the solid rocket booster........

Simply put, OUTSTANDING. Could not put it down.

And when you thought you might predict Michael's writing style with the loved characters and thought you knew what was going to happen in the next chapter......you were wrong. as the previous review said, you love the characters and the technology that works half the time, but the new technology is outstanding also and will have you living inside of a computer and understanding artificial intelligence.

From taking an OOD Qual and feeling the sweat to launching torpedoes, the artificial intelligence, the emotions........Hang on!

Awesome book, if you read Threat Vector, this book is a MUST.

Scott Turchin

Hi Scott,

I'm thrilled with your review!

Thanks so much!

I'm going on Amazon now, but they take their sweet time posting!

Michael

See you at test depth,

Michael DiMercurio

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: torpedoes
From: fabbuki
To: readermail@terminalrun.com

Dear Michael Dimercurio,

I was wondering if a fired torpedo can lose the enemy target and accidentally home in on the sub that fired it. Can the subarine's units accidentally attack its allies? Are there any safety measures that the torpedo has so it doesn't attack friendly subs? -Fabbuki oh yeah, why are torpedoes programmed to ping a certain time after launch, instead of right after it comes out of the tube?

Thanks,

fabbuki

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: torpedoes
From: Michael DiMercurio
To: Fabbuk

Hi Fabbuki,

Here are three terms from the glossary that is posted in some nook or cranny in the terminalrun.com website:

ACR (Anti-Circular Run) -- A torpedo interlock that prevents the weapon from acquiring on the firing ship ("own ship"). When the torpedo turns more than 160 degrees from the approach course to the target, the onboard gyro sends a signal to the central processor to shut down the unit. It then sinks.

ASH (Anti-Self Homing) -- A torpedo interlock that measures the distance from the firing ship. If the torpedo comes back toward the firing ship, at 80% of the return trip, the ASH interlock will shut down the unit. It will flood and sink.

Run-to-Enable – Initial torpedo run taking it away from own ship. During the run-to-enable, the warhead is not armed and the sonar is shutdown. After run-to-enable, the weapon activates the sonar system (either active or passive depending on the selection) and executes it search pattern.

  • I was wondering if a fired torpedo can lose the enemy target

    Yes it can. If it does, it goes into "reattack mode," which means it circles a few times looking for the target that it lost.

  • accidentally home in on the sub that fired it.

    This is unlikely because of ASH and ACR, but both can be disabled if desired, in which case it is possible. But the weapon can be command-shut- down if it is homing on "own ship."

  • Can the subarine's units accidentally attack its allies? Are there any safety measures that the torpedo has so it doesn't attack friendly subs?

    A torpedo can certainly home on an allied ship. The only safety measure preventing that is the crew -- not firing the weapon.

  • oh yeah, why are torpedoes programmed to ping a certain time after launch instead of right after it comes out of the tube?

    Weapons are usually launched from a "stand off range" rather than near the target, but if you are in a melee --

    Melee – A situation in submarine vs. submarine warfare in which both subs have detected each other and are trying to attack each other. In some cases, they are both maneuvering to try to perform passive sonar TMA on the other sub, which makes a mess because TMA assumes the target is on a constant course with a constant speed. In the case of a melee, one philosophy is to "go active" using active sonar – the other guy already knows you are there, so stealth is useless (this does not work if there are multiple hostile contacts, such as when you are in the other guy's back yard, and your active sonar may tip off other hostile combatants). When you go active you get a quick firing solution so you can hit him with one shot. A second philosophy is to clear datum – run away – and then come back with stealth on your side. A third philosophy resembles the Western shootout, in which you execute a snapshot salvo to see if you can fill the water with weapons to either scare the opposition or kill him with a lucky shot.

    --then you might shoot close with ASH and ACR disabled with "immediate enable" selected so the torpedo would go active as soon as it leaves "own ship."

    See you at test depth,

    Michael DiMercurio

  • -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: The Complete Idiot's Guide to Submarines
    From: Chuck Starnes
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    What is the projected release date for The Complete Idiot's Guide to Submarines and what is the expected cost?

    V/R

    Chuck Starnes

    Hi Chuck,

    I'm trying to get the final word on this. We were a month late with the manuscript (later than publisher wanted, a month earlier than contract). They had wanted this out pronto. I e-mailed in to my co-author to find out...I'll put this in a newsletter when we get the word!

    See you at test depth,

    Michael DiMercurio

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Submarine Service
    From: Benjamin Dedrick
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    Mr. DiMercurio,

    Sir, my name is Ben Dedrick. I am a submariner and I have been enjoying your books for several years. I read Voyage of the Devilfish while stationed as an EM3 aboard the USS Honolulu (SSN 718) out of Pearl Harbor. We had just completed my first WESTPAC and were in our standdown period and I had about a week before I flew home to Boston on a week-long leave period when I found the book at the exchange. The book was a great read, I finished in about 24 hours...I found it very hard to put down. I would have said that your writing was on par with Tom Clancy, except for the fact that you get just a vivid picture of the people, the submarine life, and the story plot without as much unnnecessary fluff.

    Two years ago I temporarily left active duty to return home to Boston to finish my undergrad degree at Tufts University. This past May I graduated and started paperwork to enter active duty again and return to the fleet, where I feel that I belong. Since graduation I have been waiting for the paperwork to go through (we had an administrative difficulty as I was advanced on the E-5 exam but the results were published just before my seperation and it was never updated in my record so in the meantime we have to wait for the Board of Naval Corrections and Records to decide if my record should show me seperating as an E-4 or and E-5 so we can work with the detailer with regards to my next boat) and I have spent much of the time reading some of your other works.

    Over the past few months I have read Barracuda Final Bearing, and Piranha Firing Point, I am currently in the middle of Attack of the Seawolf, and also have purchased Threat Victor to read during this week that I am on vacation in VT with my family. I have been impressed with each of the stories I have read so far and I love how descriptive you have been with regards to submarine life. I tell everyone how your books help keep me motivated with regards to returning to the fleet and the prospect of OCS in about a year (in hopes of staying in the submarine fleet).

    Besides desiring to tell you how much I have been getting from your books, I also wish to ask you a question. In many of the later books I have read, references have been made to the Islamic War that was fought with ADM Pacino's submarine force. Is there a book that I have not yet that covers that/those battle(s) or is it just something that occured in the lives of your characters in between stories? It does not look like Threat Victor covers it, but does Phoenix Sub Zero?

    Sir, thank you again for your works. I hope that you keep them coming as long as you can...and I promise I will read any future books that you write! Possibly some more on Bruce Phillips' career? He reminds me a lot of my second CO, CDR John Richardson, a leader who cares for his people as much as he does his mission. I hope that upon commissioning I can live up to the standards set by yourself, ADM Pacino, CDR Phillips, and my own former CO, CDR Richardson!

    Very Respectfully,
    Benjamin Dedrick

    -------- Original Message -------- Subject: Re: Submarine Service From: "Michael DiMercurio" To:

    Hi Ben,

    I really enjoyed your email. Long live the U.S. submarine force.

    The Islamic war is in Phoenix Sub Zero, which is tough to find since it is being republished as we speak.

    Naturally I'm glad you liked the reality of the books, since the control room conversations mimic reality, while the books of my competitors make the control room sound like a treehouse or cub scout meeting.

    Anyhow, best of luck and let me know how you like TERMINAL RUN.

    See you at test depth,

    Michael DiMercurio

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: great writing
    From: Peter Hoogendoorn
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    Hi,

    I am normally not so much into reading books at all but sofar I've read the first four books of which the last two ones within 4 days (Phoenix & Barracuda) Can you please tell me when the last three Piranha firing point / Threat Vector and Terminal run) will be available in Dutch translation ?

    For what it's worth, am a great fan of dimercurio's style of writing.

    best regards,

    Peter Hoogendoorn
    Netherlands

    Hi Peter,

    I'm not sure when the next books come out in Dutch, but it should be soon! Please let me know how you like the new ones when they do come, and thank you so much for writing me!

    See you at test depth,

    Michael DiMercurio

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Original Devilfish Patch
    From: Ken Johnson
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    I visited Ben Bastura's private Submarine Library Museum in Middletown, CT on Saturday. Among the items in his extensive collection is the original drawing drawn by Walt Disney in 1944 of the first Devilfish patch design. (See my attached photo)

    By the way, Clancy has been there several times, but Ben has never heard of you. He is a walking encyclopedia of submarine knowledge and if you are still writing chapters of "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Submarines", he ought to be a valuable resource. I won't tell you Ben's impression of Clancy, but he only has one of his books and is not interested in fictional submarine novels, just the facts. He just may have taught Clancy a good deal of what he knows about submarines.

    Your loyal fan,

    Ken Johnson

    [drawing by Walt Disney in 1944]
    CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Re: Hello again from the Hammer
    From: Mike Creider
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    Micheal,

    You won't see me at test depth again until I have my life insurance paid up. *LOL*

    Good to hear from you again.

    As a matter of fact, the run to the North Pole in November 1970 was quite a run. We took the route between Greenland and Canada rather than around the east coast of Greenland. It was a very dangerous journey. And since my job was that of a sonar tech, my time on the Hammer on that trip (or any of her other patrols then) was NOT boring.

    This Pole Run had its exciting moments, the most exciting being the time we barely missed a huge iceberg on the way to the Pole. Our normal plan of attack when encountering an iceberg is to go under it and come up on the other side while all along tracking the distance between the sail and the bottom of the iceberg using the top sounder. One iceberg we encountered was named Old Grandad for good reason. We approaced this iceberg like any other with the top sounder pinging away as the chart displayed the distance between the sail and the iceberg. The captain took the usual tact and starting our dive below Old Grandad. As the Hammer went deeper into the water, the bottom of the iceberg continued its descent towards the sail while the bottom of the ocean floor continued to reach upwards to the hull. Shortly it became crystal clear after we had reached 400 feet that we had to evade this iceberg. Captain PF Carter ordered the helm to go starboard to go around the iceberg while continuing our descent.

    We missed the iceberg according to the top sounder chart by approximately 10 feet.

    On our return trip from the Pole, we watched out for Old Grandad, encountering it once again. This time the captain steered clear of this iceberg not wanting to test our luck again.

    The Hammer was the first submarine to reach the North Pole during the fall season.

    Those were heady days, those days when Powell F. Carter had the conn. No other captain while I was on the Hammer crew for five years could hold a candle to that man.

    Remember our comrades on silent patrol.

    Mike

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Michael DiMercurio
    To: Mike
    Subject: Re: Hello again from the Hammer

    Hi Mike,

    The 70 pole shot was something I used to stare at while getting my ass chewed by the captain, like staring up at an altar. Must have been some run.

    See you at test depth,

    Michael DiMercurio

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Re: N. Pole
    From: Mike
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    Michael,

    Yes, I do. I have a photo that I took and, I think, one that was the official photo. I liked mine better. I'll need to scan the images and get them to you. Look for them in a couple of days.

    P.F. Carter left the Hammer to become Commodore of the Navy base in Rota, Spain. What happened to him after that is not known to me. I'd think that the USN Bupers would have some info on him. You'd have enjoyed working for Carter. The first thing he did when he arrived on the Hammer was give most of this ward room (officers) bad fitness reports. And most of the officers deserved the bad reports. Needless to say, they shaped up real quick. And it was needed big time because the Hammer was about to head out on a couple of interesting patrols to the Barents Sea. Under Carter's command, the Hammer did some neat things. And as a sonar tech, I got to enjoy some of those adventures first hand while sitting at the stack. Carter was the youngest four-striper in the Navy at the time he was promoted to that rank. Lord, the Hammer had to render colors to about everything that floated because of his juinor status among real captains. He had the utmost respect of his enlisted crew as well, being a mustanger didn't hurt him at all with his crew. He was a good man, one with whom I was proud to serve.

    Mike

    --- Original Message ---
    From: Michael DiMercurio
    To: Mike
    Subject: N. Pole

    Mike,

    Have you got a jpg of that pole surfacing? I'd like to post it on the website with your email.

    What ever became of Cdr PT Carter?

    See you at test depth,

    Michael DiMercurio

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Please dont stop writing!
    From: Craig Storey
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    Dear Michael,

    Greetings from Australia I just finished reading Attack of the Sea Wolf ! it was fantastic, Ive read your other books to date and am off now to get your newest book, I cant wait. You and Michael Pacino "Kick Ass". It would be fantastic to see one of your books on the big screen

    Ive read all of Patrick Robinsons books, Tom Clancy's and many others but they just cant compete with you. Please dont stop writing!

    Yours sincerley,
    Craig Storey

    Hi Craig,

    It was great to hear from you, particularly your feelings (completely justified) about Pacino vs. his competitors (competitors who ain't got no soul)!

    Thanks so much, and please let me know the instant you see a TERMINAL RUN show up in Australia!

    Best regards and see you at test depth,

    Michael DiMercurio

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: My review on ATTACK OF THE SEAWOLF
    From: Ian Dugan
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    Here is that review for you.

    The Return of Commander Devilfish, September 23, 2002 Reviewer: Ian Dugan (see more about me) from Philadelphia, PA USA I enjoyed this book considerably when I first read it. It was my beginning in submarine novels, producing a desire to further explore the reaches of submarine novelism, in particular the works of Michael DiMercurio. I liked the allusions to the old Devilfish, the expression of Michael Pacino's feelings as the son of the Devilfish returns to a profession long buried within the radioactive remains of his former command. I also enjoyed the technical diagrams that are displayed at the beginning of the book, helping the reader to get somewhat of an inside glimpse of the vessels as Captain Pacino and his fellow submariners take to the dark depths. The book has something for the technical reader, even describing the weapons' functionality and processes of action. Mr. DiMercurio also adds something of a personality to the weapons themselves, providing a torpedo-camera/ bird's eye view from launch to impact. Although the descriptions can become a bit combersome, perhaps even wearying to some, they do add a bit more flavor to the story, making it far more in-depth than simply rattling off one weapon launch after another. The losses are also real, emphasising the fact that the good guy does not always get away unscathed, that the situations are often frought with danger and serious consequences, and the fact that a submarine commander is often faced with decisions that may send men to terrible deaths for the sake of their country. The scenery is very vivid in this book, from launch to detonation, beginning to end, as the commander of SSN-21 Seawolf attempts to keep his friend's own boat from becoming a grave itself.

    If you are something of a subhunter as I, one who enjoys immensely the action and danger that the mysterious submarine entails, then raise your scope to this thriller. If your interest is peaked, you may find yourself hungering to go to sea with Captain Pacino again. And by the end of it, you may feel that, instead of having read a book, you have stepped off of the deck of a submarine.

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Fan Mail
    From: Thomas Cray
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    Dear Mr. DiMercurio,

    I wanted to be one of the many readers that writes to you telling you how much I enjoyed your books. I have only read 4 of them so far but as I find the rest I blaze through them with fascination and delight. As a youth I didn't read much at all, school was just a skimming lesson to make the grade, never paying much attention to what my eyes came across. Nothing really caught my interest, or if it did, it was written over my head and I had to spend more time researching the material rather than enjoying the reading. Trying to read Tom Clancy's books still has that effect on me, everything is over my head and it has taken me a few nights to get through a handfull of pages.

    I enjoy the way you write a great deal, everyone I turn on to your books gets the same explaination. "Its like you are sitting right there on the conn with the captain. You can picture everything that is said, just like you are watching a movie."

    I am greatly anticipating your new books, Submarines for Dummies, and Terminal Run. One question I didn't have answered by your FAQ's page on the website (big thumbs up by the way) was, what authors do you recommend for the "average" reader. I am only a young buck at the ripe age of 24, I am fascinated with the submarine forces, and even the SEALs have a bright star in the sky of interests that I have in my head. I don't believe that military service is right for me, but I am able to live part of the life through your books and others as well. So far I have you at the top of the list, O R R Wells and Clancy, but you read my explaination on him. But other than that I am fairly new to the subject matter. What sort of process do you go through to give your characters their names and backgrounds? Do you consider using random names, or perhaps the names of some of your readers? If you get a crazy feeling you could feel free to put my name in your books as a character name, that would really be tops, just a thought though! Lt. Thomas Cray, looks nice on paper doesn't it?

    Also, do you have any sources on some good looking posters of subs, or books....etc...I would like to put some stuff up in my office to sort of surround me in an environment that I am growing to enjoy by the page! Thank you for your long hours putting words to paper so that "landlubbers" like myself can enjoy the spray of the sea clear up in the plains of Kansas.

    Keep up the awesome work, I look forward to spending a lot of time reading your work in the future.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas Cray

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Re: Submarine Service
    From: Ben Dedrick
    To: readermail@terminalrun.com

    Mr. DiMercurio,

    Thank you so much for the email! The fact that you care enough about your readers to respond to them speaks a lot of you! I will have to get Phoenix Sub Zero as soon as I can find it...to sort of fill in the blanks in ADM Pacino's life story!

    I ordered Terminal Run via Amazon.com so hopefully that should be here soon and I will let you know what I think as soon as I read through it. I'm sure I will have nothing but positives to say about it...the only question I have to ask is...what next? Do you have any story plans post-Pacino legacy?

    Ben Dedrick

    -------- Original Message --------
    Subject: Re: Submarine Service
    From: Michael DiMercurio
    To: Ben Dedrick

    Thanks Ben,

    I'm standing by for your thoughts on Terminal Run.

    The next book (TITLE CLASSIFIED) is going very well. I think you'll enjoy it (if I can just get off email long enough to write it!).

    See you at test depth,

    Michael DiMercurio

    [EMERGENCY DEEP]

    MORE! On EMERGENCY DEEP

    EMERGENCY DEEP:
    First in an electrifying new series from “A MASTER RIVALING TOM CLANCY.”

    --Publishers Weekly

    U.S. Navy submarine commander Peter Vornado is at the top of his game in underwater warfare when a devastating illness takes him out of the service and almost to the grave. Without duty, honor, or something to fight for, his life is as good as over.

    But the CIA needs a man like Vornado…

    A terrorist cabal has acquired a scrapped Soviet sub from the Cold War -- a technologically advanced failure still able to outrun any torpedo or enemy vessel and strike at will. With a nuclear payload, it will enable them to strike directly at Israeland throw the world into chaos. All that remains is to modernize the sub with the latest technology.

    Only one man can infiltrate the group, take the helm, and stop a holocaust -- a man who has already stared down death, and is ready to do battle once more…

    “Compelling and visionary. DiMercurio’s characters run as deep as his submarines themselves!”

    --Joe Buff, author of Crush Depth and Thunder in the Deep

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    Michael DiMercurio
    Princeton, New Jersey
    E-mail:
    readermail@terminalrun.com

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